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Domesticated steph

The week of Christmas fell swiftly upon us and without much fanfare. I have several family celebrations to attend this weekend, which means I am in the kitchen this week. A lot.

My dad's side of the family doesn't have any cooks, which is a little scary. I actually have one aunt and uncle who do not own an oven. (Luckily this is not the aunt hosting our Saturday get-together) My mother has two celebrations at her house so I am baking and cooking what I can to help her out. Tonight I found myself elbow deep in powered sugar.

It's become a tradition for me to bake a classic French dessert, the Bûche de Noël each year. It started with my brother taking French in high school... and I followed in his footsteps. I don't remember the specifics, but most likely our French teacher brought the dessert during a Christmas party. My brother ohhhed and ahhhed over it so much, that I made a point to get the recipe while I was taking classes from the same teacher. Tonight I remembered why I only make this thing once a year. It's not hard, it's just messy. I have powered sugar in parts of my kitchen I didn't know I had. Which is incredibly handy, because my kitchen is huge. I'm planning to find said sugar until Easter.

I also baked my "famous" praline chex mix tonight- and now I have a few smashed pieces of cereal on my floor.

Also on my list... pumpkin cheesecake, chicken tortilla soup, a relish tray, a fruit and chocolate fondue dip... and to top it all off, my grandmother's sweet potatoes.

Somehow I ended up with all the messy food. Hmm. I wonder if my mother planned it that way.


What I'm listening to: Relient K's Deck the Halls, Bruise Your Hand
What I'm reading: Mike Yaconelli's Messy Spirituality

Comments

ptg said…
The yule log cake sounds good, but I wonder how the chicken tortilla soup made it onto the holiday menu?
stephanie said…
Hee. Weird choice, I know. But I was looking for something different, light and would taste good with prime rib. As a kid, my dad grew up with Christmas Eve being soup night, but I really hate oyster stew. So this is what I agreed to make.

Besides, if you ever tasted my chicken tortilla soup, you wouldn't need to ask. Yes, it's that good. Now I need to go squeeze my head through the doorway because it's too big.

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